Pages

Why?

The following post has not been designed to offer a practical tool, device, website, or any sort of the usual contribution to your tabletop game. I have instead chosen to discuss the nature of the game and several matters pertaining thereof in a philosophical context. If such a thing doesn't interest you, please feel free to disregard the contents of this message.


I won't mind, really.




To severely abridge a somewhat long and convoluted story, my personal motivations for engaging in tabletop activities have been recently brought into a scope of deep introspection. Certain influences within my life had forced me to sincerely prioritize the significance of this time-consuming hobby in relation to other, seemingly more productive expenditures of my free time. With my deep infatuation of constant self-improvement looming overhead, I found myself in need of a truly valid reason to continue in this leisurely pursuit. Failure to do so would turn this once cherished past time into something of a guilty pleasure, as I was certain to give myself much grief over engaging in an activity deemed to be 'wasteful'.


Fortunately, I was able to resolve the matter in a timely fashion; as evidenced by the continuation of this Blog, my enjoyment of tabletop activities remains regular and guilt-free. The matter, as strange as it may sound to some, wasn't about refining social ability or improving my basic arithmetic skills, or any of those other commonly-touted reasons; a revelation that came with much surprise when contrasted by my aforementioned love of self-improvement. It was instead a preservation of a less mature 'self', an infantile part of my being that, no matter how jaded, bitter, or disillusioned the 'adult' me would become, would still take the risk to believe that a form of magic still existed somewhere in the universe. My inner child had spoken in favor of role playing, and I was compelled to listen.


I may have lost some of you just now with the admittance of such unconscious innocence and naivety. You may believe that I'm alone in my willingness to preserve this 'inner child', but I've recently become of the belief that everyone, no matter how old or experienced, keeps a flame burning for that one day when destiny may call on them to embark on a journey greater than they've ever known. As children, we learn of these stories in which some ordinary, everyday protagonist is suddenly stripped of their normal lives and thrust into a foreign role to fulfill some task that only they can accomplish, often in a land entirely alien to them. Other times, these stories may detail a special individual that appears without warning, seemingly out of nowhere, and forever changes one's life for the better (or more interesting, at least). This feeling of escape into an exciting realm of the unknown fascinates us, making those who hear these tales yearn for their own adventure of fantastic proportions.


So we wait, watch, and hope for the signs of our impending journey. We dream thoughts and scribble pictures of our glorious quest to be. Birthday wishes are spent conjuring the catalyst that will change our lives forever, but it never comes. Year by year, we grow weary of awaiting the distressed damsel or the shining knight's call and the magic fades, kicked to the side by the inexorable realities of life. The fantasies of escapism that once occupied our every thought are soon placed on the same dust-covered shelf that holds our forgotten toys and undersized clothes.


Most will call this a natural stage in the process of 'growing up' and for the most part, I agree with this sentiment. It's quite unhealthy and unrealistic to preserve the expectation of someday being rescued from one's mundane life (that requires solely personal intervention, but I digress). The part that troubles me is the loss of child-like escapism; that is, to say, there's absolutely nothing wrong with playing pretend, as long as you have a firm grasp with which to facilitate your return to reality. Growing up is fine and healthy and all that, but there's no reason to lose your youthful sense of wonder and curiosity, even if it's seldom used.


Obviously, this is where things like tabletop/role playing games come into play, thus allowing said imagination a structure in which it can take refuge and flourish. This recreational activity, however, is not available to most, due to a combination of widely varying factors, such as insufficient funds, inadequate company, or just simple ignorance of the game (which you just lost). Such inhibitions, while far from the worst fate that can befall a person, are quite regrettable, as these individuals can miss out on the very escape from their 'normal' lives that had been so greatly anticipated by them so many birthdays ago. I'm not going to say that every session around a cramped table whilst flanked by sweaty neckbeards is going to be magical, but when the day comes that an experienced Host is joined by awesome Players, the resulting events can be quite memorable, if not downright moving.


That rare spark of genius, that one-in-a-million adventure that will forevermore stand out in the Player's mind; that is why I play, and more importantly, why I act as my group's regular Host. Not too long ago, through the charitable actions of several individuals now close to my heart, I was introduced to the wonderful world of tabletop gaming. This discovery bettered me as a social individual, revived my once-forgotten sense of childish escapism, and gave me the tools I needed to honor their contributions to my life by passing on the kindnesses they've shown me to others. Whether it be someone who's only heard of 'D&D' in passing or an experienced vet who designs his own miniatures, I've decided to dedicate my career in tabletop gaming to providing the most well-crafted, immersive experience I can muster.


For my Players, the under privileged, the ignorant, and everyone who's never had the adventures they dreamed of as children, I shall press on.

51 comments:

Intraman said...

glad you could find happiness in gaming, there's no reason to feel guilty or be ashamed!

Potholderz said...

Nice post, love your writing style, keep it up.

Algorithmic said...

Love what you do, that's all that matters.

CandleintheDark said...

This is interesting. Time management is a big problem for me too, but don't sacrifice what you love to do

theWhale said...

I agree.

//Love said...

Me neither, be yourself

Innov8 Graphics said...

I find happiness in gaming to, so dont sweat it!

tommyth3cat said...

Gaming with good pals is always a great experience. I myself have never done any tabletop stuff, but I wouldn't be opposed to the idea it sounds fun if you have good people to play with.

ChazWellington said...

great interpretation

Dola said...

gaming is addictive! thats why it makes you happy =x

RageCompeX said...

because....

Tommy said...

I find happiness in gaming to, and I think there is nothing wrong in these

Fortune said...

Very heartfelt, long... but good read.

m.m. said...

There's nothing wrong with gaming! You don't have to "grow up." Stay young at heart :)

mindlessfrk said...

Agreed. We must preserve our Inner child, I'm still 17, but I'm trying really hard not to become a boring adult xD

Gheko said...

I really like your writing style.. albeit a little whiny.. :P

cheshire said...

I enjoyed reading your thoroughly well written, satirically humorous and completely grammatically correct post.

DocStout said...

Someone who finds moments spent in play as something for children, or wasteful doesn't know very much about life, and I sincerely pity them.

Sety said...

yeah, there's nothing wrong with gaming, it's a good hobby

Blogger said...

+1 definitely

Justin said...

There's nothing wrong with gaming, keep doing it if you like it

Xenototh said...

And suddenly you went all deep on us. Any particular reason this was on your mind to discuss with us?

James said...

gaming can bring true bliss.

Jake said...

Man that was lengthy, yet I read through it. I guess good luck with the journey there.

J.R. said...

If gaming makes people happy then there isn't anything wrong with it. Much worse vices in the world

Dola said...

keep up the strong thoughts!

ClassicPhil said...

Nice contribution lol

Wolle said...

keep going

Darick Pascua said...

man your sick.

TheLanderson27 said...

nice post man!

Blogger said...

LOL

psychologypost said...

keep it up dude

Admin said...

Gaming makes a lot of people happy. I'm not one of those people, but I respect them.

L-shift said...

What a strong reading. Loved it the whole time.

The Viking said...

Long post, but it was actually worth reading. Keep up the good work :)

Zealot said...

I think everyone has that question about any time consuming hobby.

Sleemac said...

hey there fellow RPGer, nice to find a blog on the topic :)

TK1927 said...

This is really interesting. It's nice to see people passionate about their hobbies.

Lasse said...

Never stop blogging! :D

Blogger said...

i love you :D (i'm not gay)

Dola said...

no activity is truly ever wasteful theres always a purpose or meaning to it even if you dont really think about it as such

LiquorKing said...

Strong post, must be your deepest yet.

Lasse said...

We all long gaming! No guilty pleasures ;p

Blogger said...

LOL

Geoffrey said...

It's always interesting for me to learn about why others have made the decision to do the things they do. I loved this post.

JayPower said...

Interesting thaughts man ;D

Tomás Franco Ramos said...

you know, i live in a shitty country, im studying, and i used to have a part time job. I was always so fucking tired, but i saved money and i bought a ps3. now im really happy cause i can play with my girl who loves games too. I really think here's nothing to be ashamed.
anyway, have a nice week, visit me sometime!

Whitelight said...

Killer post!

Kristof Unpronounceable said...

Yeah I completely agree with the guy above me.

Jesse Crows said...

great read, thanks!

Whitelight said...

Interesting!

Post a Comment